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Category Archives: Adhesives

Chemical Price Trends – 2010 Market Opportunity Study

WomanScientistThis report details and updates for the end of 2009 specific price changes for a variety of chemicals used to make a wide range of products that either are already being made from soy derivatives or could be made from soy derivatives if affordable technology were available. It also contrasts those changes with the more stable price of soybean oil and soy protein. The price trend report was first done for the United Soybean Board (USB) in 2005, and was updated in 2008. This report for 2010 includes for the first time the implications for soy in the fiber and surfactant market areas. A chart in the report tracks the price change for 15 years for soy oil and meal versus crude petroleum and natural gas as feedstocks for industrial chemical products.

MOS_PriceTrendUpdate2010

Soy-based School of Thought at Carnegie Mellon

October, 2015

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Justin Lacey and Miriam Devlin, co-owners of Day Shift Furniture, assemble one of the 34 boxes that make up the Carnegie Mellon shelving.
Photo Credit Miriam Devlin.

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Photo Credit Miriam Devlin

Carnegie Mellon University’s (CMU) School of Design needed a showcase room to receive esteemed visitors as well as deliver comfort and durability to daily users.

A CMU alumni crafted the design solution featuring American hardwood plywood shelves and boxes made with a well-proven soy-based assembly technology which replaced formaldehyde-based glues. The design met CMU’s goals for functionality. At the same time, the choice benefits the employees and guests who work and visit the 19’ X 27’ space completed in 2011.

Working step-by-step with the CMU’s design school staff and instructors, Day Shift Furniture developed an overall plan and design for the room as well as individual pieces of furniture. Day Shift is a Pittsburg company founded by Miriam Devlin and CMU alumni Justin Lacey to design and build sustainable furniture. While at CMU, Industrie Forum Design honored Justin’s work with an IF Concept Award.

“We work to make useful, durable pieces with clean and modern forms using socially conscious, environmentally responsible, design and production processes,” said Devlin,

“We think it’s an interesting endeavor to come up with good ideas about forms, materials, and places of habitation, and then engage in the process of building them,” Devlin adds.

“Instead of standard static shelves, we were struck by a better idea,” said Lacey. “We came up with a concept of shelf boxes or ‘pixels’ rather than rigid shelves. They needed to be able to place them in an easily repeatable manner as there were 34 of them in the final composition.”

Day Shift spray finished CMU’s boxes with bright white, low-VOC, high-gloss mineral/latex enamel paint. They mounted the boxes with a specially designed system, which was tested to hold more than 125 pounds each.

To maximize book storage, the shelving boxes span the length of one entire wall. The shelving helps define the spaces, without requiring physical dividers. It unifies the sides and functions of the room. Some of the boxes had doors to store various supplies, such as audio visual equipment and dishes.

Adhesives_Carnegie Mellon_LivingRoom

Miriam Devlin’s solution to shelving was an innovative series of boxes made from Columbia Forest Products’ PureBond plywood. The well-proven assembly technology uses soy instead of formaldehyde-based glues.
Photo Credit Miriam Devlin

Day Shift constructed the boxes from PureBond® — a domestically-produced hardwood plywood from Columbia Forest Products where panels are bonded with soy protein.  In 2005, Columbia Forest Products started manufacturing hardwood plywood using an innovative soy protein process to assemble panels, replacing urea formaldehyde.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) honored the researchers who developed this new soy-based panel assembly approach with the 2007 Presidential Green Chemistry Award. According to the EPA, the technology represented the “first cost-competitive, environmentally friendly adhesive that replaced the toxic urea–formaldehyde (UF) resin.” Since its full conversion to PureBond assembly in 2006, Columbia has now manufactured more than 50 million sheets, eliminating more than 300,000 tons of UF resins and the formaldehyde exposure risk to its employees, supply chain partners and customers downstream.

The technology also represented a new use for soy. U.S farmers grow more than 70 million acres of U.S. soybean plants each year, offering an abundant and renewable supply of ingredients for food and livestock feed as well as industrial products such as soy-based adhesives.

According to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) data, about 600,000 U.S family farmers grow soybeans on the rough equivalent of 60 million football fields. Each year, those soybeans remove the carbon equivalent of taking 21 million cars off the road.

Federal law, the Federal Acquisition Regulation, and Presidential Executive Orders direct federal agencies and their contractors to purchase biobased products in categories identified by USDA. PureBond qualifies for mandatory federal purchasing because it meets the requirements of the USDA-designated biobased category for composite panels.

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The boxes at the Carnegie-Mellon Design School meeting center serve several functions ranging from book storage to kitchen supplies.
Photo Credit Miriam Devlin

According to Columbia Forest Products, the plywood decorative panels are compliant with the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED 2009) standard, earning one point for LEED’s EQ Credit 4.4 for Low-Emitting Materials: Composite Wood. PureBond decorative interior panels also satisfy the emissions standards of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) Phase 2 regulations, which will also be called for by the new LEED V4 when LEED 2009 sunsets in 2016. Upon request, PureBond products can also be supplied with Forest Stewardship Council® (FSC®) certification.

Columbia Forest Products PureBond decorative hardwood plywood panels are used to make cabinets, furniture, and a variety of other wooden fixtures in residential and commercial settings. PureBond panels are available with the industry’s widest array of species, thicknesses and value-added treatments from Columbia’s wholesale distributor network as well as at retail outlets like the Home Depot. Fabricated products are available through a variety of companies, including those participating in Columbia PureBond® Fabricator Network.

For more information about the CMU project, go to http://www.dayshiftfurniture.com/ or contact Miriam Devlin miriam@dayshiftfurniture.com or at 412-342-8426

For more information about Columbia Forest Products, go to http://www.columbiaforestproducts.com/product/purebond-classic-core/ or contact Paul Davis at Pdavis@cfpwood.com or 503-243-7311.

 

Columbia Forest Products Helps Soy-Based Adhesive Technology Branch Out

March, 2014

1 - Photo_UTTCarpetBacking (2)By the end of 2007, Columbia Forest Products had converted all seven of its hardwood-plywood plants from urea-formaldehyde-based adhesive systems to a soy-based formulation. The company subsequently sold more than 50 million PureBond® formaldehyde-free hardwood-plywood panels.

Encouraged by the response of DIYers who bought panels from home-improvement stores, Columbia branched out and created the PureBond Fabricator Network™ (PFN). This partnership of more than 850 craftsmen, cabinet shops and fabrication businesses identifies itself as leading-edge suppliers who are thoughtful about the material they use and the concern customers have with good air quality.

A gallery of stunning installations on the website provides design inspiration. When the time comes to find a fabricator, the interactive locator makes it easy for architects, builders, general contractors and homeowners to match their needs.

Crestwood, Inc., a high-quality cabinetry maker from Salina, Kan., was one of the first companies to join the network, citing a desire to be part of the “green” movement. The company states it is what its customers are looking for, and PureBond lets them provide a healthier alternative at no extra cost.

To learn more about Columbia Forest Products PureBond technology, visit www.ColumbiaForestProducts.com/PureBond. To learn more about Crestwood cabinetry, visit www.crestwood-inc.com.

Soy Becomes Important Part of Particle Board

January, 2007

Columbia Forest Products continues Adhesives_ColumbiaParticleboardto turn to soy to help improve their line of plywood products. The company has announced that it will begin producing formaldehyde-free PureBond particle board in the first quarter of 2007. Columbia’s PureBond formaldehyde-free technology involves a patented, soy-based adhesive cooperatively developed by Columbia, the College of Forestry at Oregon State University and Hercules Incorporated. Hercules has awarded Columbia a license to utilize its patented adhesive system on an exclusive basis for all of Columbia’s North American decorative panel markets.

PureBond particleboard will be manufactured at the company’s Hearst, Ontario, facility, which will also turn the board into finished hardwood plywood and melamine panels. “The soybean checkoff supports all industrial uses of soy,” says Todd Allen, United Soybean Board New Uses chair and a soybean farmer from West Memphis, Ark. “Soy is a great, environmentally friendly adhesive, used in a wide variety of products, including particleboard.”

Columbia’s PureBond formula is derived naturally then enhanced with a proprietary resin, giving it a particularly strong bonding and water-resistance qualities. This process also enables Columbia to completely eliminate formaldehyde from its standard veneer-core decorative panel production. The PureBond panels eliminate formaldehyde from both press and product emissions, which is good news for everyone, including Columbia’s employees.

The company’s formaldehyde-free decorative panels are also compliant with the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standards. LEED is the nationally accepted benchmark for the design construction and operation of high-performance green buildings. The standards focus on five areas of human and environmental health: water savings, energy efficiency, materials selection and indoor environmental quality. The architectural community has put a growing focus on indoor air quality, and the formaldehyde-free panels are a great fit to improve indoor air quality.

To learn more about Columbia Forest Products and its line of environmentally friendly products

go to http://www.columbiaforestproducts.com/.

Columbia Forest Products Helps Bullitt Center Think Soy

October, 2015

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The Bullitt Center’s many sustainable features include cabinets made from Columbia Forest Products formaldehyde-free PureBond Plywood.
Photo Credit Nic Lehoux

The Seattle-based Bullitt Foundation, led by the original Earth Day organizer Denis Hayes, set out to inspire a revolution of environmental construction, including the use of non-toxic materials. Billed as the “greenest commercial building in the world”, the Bullitt Center is the first office building to earn the International Living Future Institute’s (ILFI) Living Building certification.

Cabinets made from plywood that uses soy in the assembly technology helped the building avoid formaldehyde, one of the ILFI’s 14 “Red List” toxic substances banned from interiors of their approved buildings. The Bullitt Center has pullman kitchens on each floor. The cabinets in those kitchens are made from Columbia Forest Products’ formaldehyde-free Purebond® plywood.

The Bullitt Center is a 52,000 square-foot, six-story, market-rate, office building with commercial tenants. Living Building certification standards measure its sustainability. In addition to meeting a rigorous prerequisite for only using wood certified to Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) standards, the Bullitt Center builders also screened out toxic materials from building materials used inside the structure, including added formaldehyde. For its strict indoor air quality requirements, the Living Building certification at the time listed 14 substances it considered under its banned “Red List”. Added formaldehyde was one of those 14 substances as it related to interior plywood; no sheet goods used inside the weather barrier contained added formaldehyde.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) honored the researchers who developed the Purebond soy-based panel assembly approach with the 2007 Presidential Green Chemistry Award. According to the EPA, the technology represented the “first cost-competitive, environmentally friendly adhesive that replaced the toxic urea–formaldehyde (UF) resin.” Since its full conversion to PureBond assembly in 2006, Columbia has now manufactured more than 50 million sheets, eliminating more than 300,000 tons of UF resins and the formaldehyde exposure risk to its employees, supply chain partners and customers downstream.

The technology also represented a new use for soy. U.S farmers grow more than 70 million acres of U.S. soybean plants each year, offering an abundant and renewable supply of ingredients for food and livestock feed as well as industrial products such as soy-based adhesives.

According to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) data, about 600,000 U.S family farmers grow soybeans on the rough equivalent of 60 million football fields. Each year, those soybeans remove the carbon equivalent of taking 21 million cars off the road.

Federal law, the Federal Acquisition Regulation, and Presidential Executive Orders direct federal agencies and their contractors to purchase biobased products in categories identified by USDA. PureBond qualifies for mandatory federal purchasing because it meets the requirements of the USDA-designated biobased category for composite panels.

According to Columbia Forest Products, the plywood decorative panels are compliant with the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED 2009) standard, earning one point for LEED’s EQ Credit 4.4 for Low-Emitting Materials: Composite Wood. PureBond decorative interior panels also satisfy the emissions standards of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) Phase 2 regulations, which will also be called for by the new LEED V4 when LEED 2009 sunsets in 2016. Upon request, PureBond products can also be supplied with Forest Stewardship Council® (FSC®) certification.

Columbia Forest Products PureBond decorative hardwood plywood panels are used to make cabinets, furniture, and a variety of other wooden fixtures in residential and commercial settings. PureBond panels are available with the industry’s widest array of species, thicknesses and value-added treatments from Columbia’s wholesale distributor network as well as at retail outlets like the Home Depot. Fabricated products are available through a variety of companies, including those participating in Columbia PureBond® Fabricator Network.

For more information about the Bullitt Center, go to www.bullittcenter.org or contact Brad Kahn b.kahn@us.fsc.org at 206-419-1607,

For more information about Columbia Forest Products, go to http://www.columbiaforestproducts.com/product/purebond-classic-core/ or contact Paul Davis at Pdavis@cfpwood.com or 503-243-7311.

Soy Builds on Success in Construction Industry with New Sealants, Adhesives

May, 2009

The United Soybean Board (USB) and the soybean checkoff help develop soy technology in a number of areas, including adhesives and other emerging industrial opportunities.

May National Associates has developed a new line of adhesives and sealants, due in part to funding and networking contacts from the soybean checkoff.

The introduction of the Bondaflex Soythane product line features soy-based polymers and will help architects, specifiers and contractors meet or exceed the fast-growing demand for using sustainable products to fulfill Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) requirements.

In May 2008, May National teamed up with Dow Chemical to develop a sealant and adhesive product line that replaces traditional petroleum-based polyols with soy-based polyols. The soy-based polyols are made via RENUVA Renewable Resource Technologies from Dow, giving the products higher levels of renewable content than comparable sealants and adhesives. “What we’ve learned by including soy is that while some critical properties initially require more reformulation to achieve our performance goals, new advantages are being discovered, such as better adhesion to certain substrates than what current products provide,” says Doug Walker, vice president, sales and marketing for May National. “While we face big challenges, new discoveries are being made regularly.” The Bondaflex Soythane Construction Adhesive will be available during the construction season. Later this year, a lower modulus sealant will be available, which will offer window installers and general construction trades a product with high movement capability and adhesion to a versatile group of building materials. The company sees more products from renewable resources like soy as a continuing trend. “We are betting that those producers focused on both the need for improved energy performance and new uses of sustainable resources will welcome the soy-based alternatives we’ll provide,” says Walker. The company is making efforts to replace current fillers, pigments and solvents, with industrial recyclables and agricultural byproducts. These materials conventionally use non-recycled metals and petroleum-based solvents that are energy-intensive.

To learn more about the Bondaflex products, visit www.bondaflex.com.

Soy-Flour Adhesive Helps Reduce Formaldehyde Emissions

December, 2008

Soyad Purebond AdhesiveA new soy-flour adhesive, developed with support from the soybean checkoff, may help reduce the emissions of a known carcinogen. SOYAD from H2H Innovations replaces urea formaldehyde in wood adhesives, making the product greener and healthier. In 2004, the International Agency for Cancer Research reclassified formaldehyde from a suspect carcinogen to a known carcinogen.

The adhesive was developed by leveraging soy-based adhesive technologies from Hercules, Inc. and Heartland Resource Technologies, which formed H2H Innovations. The new company has focused on developing cost-competitive, formaldehyde-free resins for decorative plywood, wood flooring, particleboard and medium-density fiberboard markets. The joint venture will also offer technologies for oriented strand board manufacturers that allow traditional phenolic resins to be extended, resulting in lower-cost adhesives with reduced formaldehyde content.

“Reducing formaldehyde emissions is one of the major benefits of developing soy-based adhesives,” says Karen Fear, United Soybean Board New Uses vice chair and a soybean farmer from Montpelier, Ind. “Soy adhesives don’t have an odor and are environmentally friendly.” Soy meal and soy flour are only beginning to penetrate the wood-composite-glue market. For the particleboard and medium-density-fiberboard markets, the greatest interest is having a formaldehyde-free resin to resolve the issue of formaldehyde emissions. This is needed to meet current and anticipated regulatory demands and green initiatives, such as the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Designs (LEED) Green Building Rating System. SOYAD is a soy/phenolic co-resin used in exterior wood panel application, such as oriented strand board and softwood plywood.

Soy-Based Adhesives Mussel Out Formaldehyde to Meet New Regulations

May, 2015

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A decade ago, the International Agency for Cancer Research reclassified formaldehyde from a suspect carcinogen to a known carcinogen. With United Soybean Board (USB) support, Kaichang Li, an associate professor of wood science and engineering at Oregon State University, developed a soy-based formaldehyde-free resin that bonded wood like a mussel to a wet rock.

The technology was commercialized, resulting in the sale of more than 50 million formaldehyde-free plywood panels under the brand PureBond®.

New rules proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are giving researchers and manufacturers an even greater incentive to think soy. The proposed EPA rules set limits on how much formaldehyde may be released from engineered woods. The rules cover hardwood plywood, medium-density fiberboard, particleboard and finished goods containing urea-formaldehyde (UF)that are sold, supplied, offered for sale or manufactured in the United States or those imported into the country. This covers products ranging from wood paneling and home furnishings to glues, pastes, antibacterial items, shampoo, paper towels, paper stickers, phenolic resins and urea plastics used to make things like buttons and shoes.

A second proposal establishes the requirement of a third-party certification to ensure manufacturers of composite wood products meet Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) formaldehyde-emission standards. The emission standards are identical to those currently in place under the California Air Resources Board Airborne Toxic Control Measure.

The Science of Soybeans Unlike petrochemical-based wood adhesives,soy-based formulations reduce the release of volatile organic compounds. Soy flour has also proven to be an ideal raw material for making wood adhesives because it is abundant and usually costs less than petrochemicals. The relatively low cost of soy meal/flour versus petrochemical-based products has added value for manufacturers.

Although urea and phenol formaldehyde have not been completely replaced by soy in all wood adhesives, even a partial replacement can represent large cost savings. As concerns about environmental exposure to formaldehyde continue to surface, cost-competitive, versatile soy-based wood adhesives are the natural choice in adhesive formulations. To learn more about new soy-based adhesives for wood, check out the 2014 Soy Products Guide at www.SoyNewUses.org.

Biobased Solutions is the flagship newsletter of USB New Uses, covering advances in soy research and development. Each issue transmits electronically every two months and highlights four stories in soy technology and soy-based product success. To subscribe to Biobased Solutions, contact Deborah Dugan at Deborah.Dugan@osbornbarr.com.

Soy Wood Adhesive a First for Franklin

September, 2010

FlooringThanks in part to funding from the United Soybean Board (USB), Franklin Adhesives & Polymers recently introduced a new bio-modified adhesive. According to the company, this soy-based adhesive for use in manufacturing engineered wood flooring will demonstrate user-friendliness and eco-friendliness at the same time. According to Franklin, soy offers environmental and performance benefits when used in adhesives. Soy represents a renewable feedstock that can replace petrochemical and formaldehyde-containing materials in adhesives. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified formaldehyde as a known carcinogen. Soy also offers such performance benefits as greater physical flexibility and longer open time, or more time between the application of an adhesive and when it begins to set.

“Soy provides a natural, renewable alternative to petrochemical-based raw materials,” says Mark Vrana, Ph.D., vice president of technology and quality at Franklin. “Furthermore, it is available in adequate quantities and at an appropriate price point to support large-scale industrial manufacturing processes.”

By extending the open times, Franklin says the adhesive will work well in prepress operations. It can be used in most hot-press operations that have a prepress without special mixing and has performed in a variety of climate conditions. The one-part adhesive requires no mixing, features good tack and includes between 47 and 50 percent solids. It also meets American National Standards Institute and Hardwood Plywood and Veneer Association specifications for water resistance on most wood species. USB provides funding for research and development of soy-based industrial and consumer products. With USB’s help, manufacturers commercialize dozens of new soy-based products every year.

“We’re extremely grateful to USB for their financial support, which provided Franklin with an added incentive to evaluate soy as an adhesive raw material,” Vrana says. “Our goal in the development process was to maintain the performance of a traditional product, while lessening environmental impact through the use of biobased raw materials. Multibond MX-100 meets that goal.”

Soy-Based Adhesives Adhere to Industry Needs

March, 2006

BBSNov2009SoyadfiberboardCommon wood products such as plywood have used soy-based adhesives for over 70 years. With the introduction of urea-formaldehyde and phenol-formaldehyde resins in the late 1930s, increased water resistance and lower costs were realized compared to older soy products. Increased prices for petroleum-based products, environmental concerns and human health issues have prompted demand for a renewable feedstock, causing a resurgence of interest in the development of new soy-based products for the wood adhesives industry. This led to the United Soybean Board and soybean checkoff funding of research studies into soy-based adhesive alternatives.

Continued development and adoption of soy-based wood adhesives have cost-saving advantages and increased environmental benefits across various lumber products, including wood panel products (plywood, veneer, oriented strand board, particleboard and medium-density fiberboard), engineered lumber, green framing lumber and wood pallets.

Currently, efforts are under way to develop and commercialize an improved waterproof product that replaces phenol-formaldehyde. Kymene/soy flour technology from Hercules, Inc. is being used.

Soy Flour

Finely ground soy flour can be combined with other commercially available resins such as phenol-formaldehyde and ethylene discarnate to form wood adhesives, generally by dissolving soy flour in a sodium hydroxide solution. Variations in formulations will result in a wide range of strength and other properties. Additional research will determine the limits of these mixtures and test the performance of resulting products. Early evidence shows promising economic benefits with no discovered problems in performance. Normally these adhesives are for use in the production of wood panels.

The move toward soy flour might someday completely replace formaldehyde in plywood adhesives. The World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (INARC) has designated urea formaldehyde as “carcinogenic to humans.”

Currently, Hercules, Inc., offers a Kymene/Soy Flour adhesive for use in hardwood plywood and particleboard manufacturing. Kymene is a water-soluble product that has been used for over 40 years to add wet strength to tissue and other paper products.

The Kymene portion of the adhesive, a range of polymer products, is combined with soy flour, obtained from a different source, on-site by end users in ratios specific to the function required. Cost comparisons for the Kymene/soy flour adhesive technology are expected to be equal to current urea-formaldehyde-based adhesive technology. Researchers are optimistic that Kymene/soy flour adhesive technology will also be cost-competitive against various other formaldehyde-based adhesives.

While research continues to determine the limits of these mixtures and to test the performance of resulting products, early appraisals show promising economic benefits with no discovered problems in performance.

For more technical information on soy-based adhesives, visit www.unitedsoybean.org/newuses.

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